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St Margaret's C of E Primary School

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Phonics

At St Margaret's we follow the Letters and Sounds scheme of work with the Jolly Phonics actions. 

 

In reception we learn phases 1, 2, 3, and 4. We learn a new sound Monday to Thursday then recap on Friday. 

 

Attached is a list of high frequency words. High frequency words are words than can be decoded or have to be learnt by sight.

Phase 1 

Phase 1 is the first stage of phonics and is often taught in nurseries and at the beginning of Reception. At St Margaret's we teach phase 1 in the first half term of school.

 

Phase 1 of Letters and Sounds concentrates on developing children's speaking and listening skills and lays the foundations for the phonic work which starts in Phase 2. The emphasis during Phase 1 is to get children attuned to the sounds around them and ready to begin developing oral blending and segmenting skills.

 

Phase 1 is divided into seven aspects. Each aspect contains three strands: Tuning in to sounds (auditory discrimination), Listening and remembering sounds (auditory memory and sequencing) and Talking about sounds (developing vocabulary and language comprehension).

 

It is intended that each of the first six aspects should be dipped into, rather than going through them in any order, with a balance of activities. Aspect 7 will usually come later, when children have had plenty of opportunity to develop their sound discrimination skills.

 

The aspects cover;

  • Environmental sounds
  • Instrumental sounds
  • Body percussion (e.g. clapping and stamping)
  • Rhythm and rhyme
  • Alliteration
  • Voice sounds
  • Oral blending and segmenting (e.g. hearing that d-o-g makes ‘dog’)
  •  

Typical activities for teaching Phase 1 phonics include 'listening' walks, playing and identifying instruments, action songs, learning rhymes and playing games like I Spy.

 

This phase is intended to develop children’s listening, vocabulary and speaking skills.

Phase 2

In Phase 2, letters and their sounds are introduced one at a time. A set of letters is taught each week. At St Margaret's we learn a new sound Monday to Thursday and recap learnt sounds on Friday.

 

Phase 2 sounds are learnt in the in the following sequence:

Set 1: s, a, t, p
Set 2: i, n, m, d
Set 3: g, o, c, k
Set 4: ck, e, u, r
Set 5: h, b, f, ff, l, ll, ss

 

As soon as each set of letters is introduced, children will be encouraged to use their knowledge of the letter sounds to blend and sound out words. For example, they will learn to blend the sounds s-a-t to make the word sat. They will also start learning to segment words. For example, they might be asked to find the letter sounds that make the word tap from a small selection of magnetic letters.

 

Phase 2 introduces high frequency words (tricky words). These are common words that often appear in written texts that can be decoded (sounded out) or exception words that need to be learnt by sight like the and I.

Phase 3

By the time they reach Phase 3, children will already be able to blend and segment words containing the 19 letters taught in Phase 2.

 

Over the twelve weeks which Phase 3 is expected to last, twenty-five new graphemes are introduced (one at a time).

Set 6: j, v, w, x

Set 7: y, z, zz, qu

Consonant digraphs: ch, sh, th, ng

Vowel digraphs: ai, ee, igh, oa, oo, ar, or, ur, ow, oi, ear, air, ure, er

 

During Phase 2 and 3, children will learn the letter name as well as it's sound.

 

In phase 3 phonics children will learn more high frequency words. 

Phase 4

When children start Phase Four of the Letters and Sounds phonics programme, they will know a grapheme for each of the 42 phonemes. They will be able to blend phonemes to read CVC (consonant-vowel-consonant) words and segment in order to spell them.

 

Children will also have begun reading straightforward two-syllable words and simple captions, as well as reading and spelling some high frequency words.

 

In Phase 4, no new graphemes are introduced. The main aim of this phase is to consolidate the children's knowledge and to help them learn to read and spell words which have adjacent consonants, such as trap, string and milk.

 

Read write ink - letter formation

100 High Frequency Words

Useful Phonics websites
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